Goodbye to All That

The patriarchy is dying. Here's the proof.

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thegoodshopper:

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A vagina is a responsibility, a pleasure, and an enigma every woman is born with, but it comes with no official user’s guide, let alone a decent app. This leaves the playing field wide open for feminist bestseller-maker Naomi Wolf and her latest book,

Joseph Gordon-Levitt on Why He's a Feminist

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"That was something that my mom would always point out to my brother and me, that our culture does often portray women especially… like objects. For example, we would always watch Lakers games as a…

l yn n co a d y

Heya people: Goodbye to all That is saying goodbye for the time being, but before I sign off I’d like to invite you to a) Read the piece in Eighteen Bridges magazine, Twilight of the Patriarchs, for which I started keeping this blog — it’s interesting to take note of the way many of the issues raised in the essay (women’s harassment online, the GOP assault on reproductive rights, etc.) have endured and evolved in the past year.  

And b) please check out my personal website, linked to above, which is now a Tumblr! Because why wouldn’t it be? Tumblr rules.

“And I want to try and convey to you, broadly, how you are hurting women and hurting your own art form, and how easy it would be to stop. Because right now you’re coming across like a bunch of entitled babies terrified of a few girls in your clubhouse—demanding that women be thick-skinned about their own rapes while you’re too thin-skinned to handle even mild criticism. It’s embarrassing.”

“There are some dinosaurs who want to act like none of this is happening. But then, you know what happened to the dinosaurs.”

—   

From:

What Women Want: Bylines, by Allie Jones writing in The Atlantic Wire

Stowe Boyd quotes Twilight of the Patriarchs

Lynn Coady, Twilight of the Patriarchs

In her book, Delirium: The Politics of Sex in America, Nancy L. Cohen examines how sexual hysteria has hijacked American conservative politics in recent decades. She begins her story with the arrival of the contraceptive pill in 1965, demonstrating how…

It’s not all optimism around here, I’m afraid. Yes, the patriarchy is dying, but not dead; not yet. Meanwhile, women die.
vicemag:

El Salvador to Pregnant Women: Drop Dead
El Salvador’s Supreme Court decided late last night not to allow a 22-year-old woman named “Beatriz” (an alias) to have an abortion, even though she is at risk of serious injury as a result of the pregnancy—and despite the fact that the fetus has an almost zero chance of survival because of its own health issues.
All abortion is illegal in El Salvador but Beatriz’s supporters hoped the Supreme Court would make an exception in this case. After deliberating for fifteen-days, the Salvadoran Supreme Court revealed the fate of Beatriz, the nom de guerre of the five-month-pregnant 22-year-old woman who had legally appealing for a potentially life-saving “therapeutic abortion.” That’s not to say she’ll die when she gives birth in four months—though it’s a possibility, considering she suffers from lupus, an illness which has given her kidney disease as one of its many side-effects, not to mention her fetus is anencephalic, which means it’s missing parts of its brain or skull and thus will live anywhere from only minutes to mere weeks.
Also hanging in the balance these past two weeks was the question: In this staunchly Catholic country—which has declared all abortion illegal since 1998, even in cases of rape, incest, or maternal mortality—would this young woman win the right to choose for or against an abortion in the name of her own health and safety.
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It’s not all optimism around here, I’m afraid. Yes, the patriarchy is dying, but not dead; not yet. Meanwhile, women die.

vicemag:

El Salvador to Pregnant Women: Drop Dead

El Salvador’s Supreme Court decided late last night not to allow a 22-year-old woman named “Beatriz” (an alias) to have an abortion, even though she is at risk of serious injury as a result of the pregnancy—and despite the fact that the fetus has an almost zero chance of survival because of its own health issues.

All abortion is illegal in El Salvador but Beatriz’s supporters hoped the Supreme Court would make an exception in this case. After deliberating for fifteen-days, the Salvadoran Supreme Court revealed the fate of Beatriz, the nom de guerre of the five-month-pregnant 22-year-old woman who had legally appealing for a potentially life-saving “therapeutic abortion.” That’s not to say she’ll die when she gives birth in four months—though it’s a possibility, considering she suffers from lupus, an illness which has given her kidney disease as one of its many side-effects, not to mention her fetus is anencephalic, which means it’s missing parts of its brain or skull and thus will live anywhere from only minutes to mere weeks.

Also hanging in the balance these past two weeks was the question: In this staunchly Catholic country—which has declared all abortion illegal since 1998, even in cases of rape, incest, or maternal mortality—would this young woman win the right to choose for or against an abortion in the name of her own health and safety.

Continue

“The success of the action is not just more proof that online activism is increasingly becoming feminism’s strong suit—from Facebook to Komen to transvaginal ultrasounds—but it also gives some hope that the culture is starting to shift around violence against women.”

“This isn’t a social club. This is a fucking class war.”

—   

Whoa! A good old fashioned angry feminist manifesto from Shanley over at Medium via: An Open Letter to Women in Technology. Some strong words coming out of the tech industry. It seems to me there is some serious feminist agitation happening in the tech world these days, something I point out in my essay, Twilight of the Patriarchs in the latest issue of Eighteen Bridges magazine. To wit: 

[T]ech and gaming [are] two bastions of male ‘brogrammer’ culture. But tech is also a young person’s industry, meaning an entire generation of female twenty-somethings entering the field are experiencing good-old fashioned sexism first hand and are, unsurprisingly, not standing for it.

Goes to show. Even in 2013 good old-fashioned sexism will be met with good old-fashioned fire-breathing feminism.

“It really changed the way I see men and how they see women. I was never a feminist to begin with, but now I absolutely am. I’m a smart, successful woman, and it’s sad to see how women are judged, regardless of who they are, simply by how they look. I know that that’s been going on for a long time but this opened my eyes. In terms of trusting men, it was very difficult at first. I don’t think you can ever fully recover because this changes you.”

—   

This is a quote from a Vice magazine interview with “Sarah”, a victim of revenge porn who decided to agitate for change by starting a website called EndRevengePorn.com.

More from the interview:

What’s the reception been like since you started your site?
I’ve had emails from people blaming the victims, saying they shouldn’t have taken the pictures and that running my site is a waste of time. But most of the contact is overwhelmingly supportive and it’s been amazing to speak to other victims. Danielle Citron is a law professor at the University of Maryland who’s writing a book on cyber harassment and she calls this the beginning of a cyber civil rights movement. Another law professor from the University of Miami has been working with me to draft legislation to propose at a federal and state level across the nation.

Kudos to Vice for the implicit support the magazine is showing for victims of revenge porn by running this interview. Unfortunately it’s pretty evident from the comments sections that Vice could really better quality of readers.

nationalpostsports:

NHL is ahead of its time after partnering with You Can Play
“This is evolution for us,” says Gary Bettman from his office in New York, after an afternoon spent running the media gauntlet. The National Hockey League and the NHLPA had formally announced a partnership with You Can Play on Thursday, becoming the first league to partner with a group dedicated to fighting homophobia in sports, and the commissioner had toured the major networks. Now, Bettman sounds happy. He sounds proud.

“The way it will do the league good is it will create the right environment for the league and our fans,” Bettman said. “We have been very clear in terms of what we believe is the right thing.” He’s on speakerphone, and he says to hold on for a second so he can look up and read aloud the anti-discrimination language in the 2005 collective bargaining agreement. It included sexual orientation. This is a bigger step, though.

It’s been a little more than a year since You Can Play was launched in the wake of the death of Patrick Burke’s younger brother Brendan (pictured above with the rest of the Burke family, far right), who had come out to ESPN a few months before he died in a snowy car accident in Indiana. It has been a year of patience, even as things moved fast. Burke has been very careful not to shame sports into changing for the better, but instead has worked to convince them that YCP could be trusted. No angry press releases, no PR stunt. Just methodical work.

You Can Play already had a significant presence in the NHL, with over 60 players in its PSAs, from Zdeno Chara to Steven Stamkos to Carey Price. But now it’s part of the playbook, and that’s progress. (Photos: PNG/Files/Matthew Sherwood for National Post)

(via nationalpost)

“This admirable, loving aspect of male sexuality is hidden among the detritus that passes as wisdom about what men are all about.”

Gays Welcomed By the NHL!

From Salon.com: National Hockey League announces initiative for gay athletes

The National Hockey League announced on Thursday a partnership with gay rights group You Can Play Project and an awareness-building initiative on gay issues for its coaches and players.

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The porn industry, Dines says, actually controls much of the discourse around sex. To limit that control, she argues, doesn’t restrict “free speech”. “The question is: Do we want to have broader debates and a broader discourse about sex, or do we want the pornographers to control it?”

Iceland’s work to phase out the sex industry has been done, not on a puritanical or moralistic basis, but, is simply based on the belief that “it is not acceptable that women or people in general are a product to be sold”.

—   

Fascinating piece on Iceland from Al-Jazeera. The country is seriously walking the walk in its commitment to fostering sexual equality in its culture. Iceland has actually criminalized the purchase of sex, legislated that all corporation’s boards must be 40% female and banned strip clubs. Now they are considering a ban on hardcore pornography

What’s more: these initiatives are working.

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Criminalizing “revenge porn”

From Salon.com:

Imagine a woman does a Google search on her own name and up comes a page featuring a naked photo that she sent to an ex-boyfriend. There are links to her Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn account. In the comment thread, anonymous trolls critique every inch of her body. Perhaps her home phone number and address are also included. Say she contacts the local police in tears, only to be told that the post is perfectly legal — or worse, that “boys will be boys.”

…A new bill in Florida is aiming to remedy that: It would make it a felony to publish online nude photos or videos of a person without their permission and along with identifying information. At the same time, activists around the country are petitioning for both state and federal laws to criminalize what they call “non-consensual porn.” A recent class action lawsuit filed by more than 20 women in Texas against revenge porn site Texxxan.com along with its host GoDaddy has only turned the heat up on the issue.